Beyond Victims and Warriors

Indian Country is more than a legal entity and a state of mind. It is a place journalism must find – by going there – walking the ground, encountering the people, asking questions, listening to the answers.
– Mark Trehant

Credit: urbanrez.ca

The trick to avoiding stereotypical news coverage from Aboriginal communities is digging up different stories that don’t fall into those tired victim/warrior narratives, or parrot back the latest press conference called by some aboriginal group. Simple enough, right? You just need to have your ears to the ground in Aboriginal communities.

Start by checking in regularly with the numerous Aboriginal news websites, such as turtleisland.org, mediaindigena.com, indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com. Having Aboriginal colleagues in your newsroom, or a “rainbow rolodex” (a database of aboriginal contacts) at your fingertips will help too.

But, ultimately, finding those unique stories in Indian Country is hard work. It requires persistence and an inquiring mind. And, more often than not, it takes a trip to the rez (or, in the case of an urban Aboriginal community, a trip to THAT side of town).

You’ll find much greater success in finding stories in Aboriginal communities if you get off the phone and do your research in person

You’ll find much greater success in finding stories in Aboriginal communities if you get off the phone and do your research in person. The distrust of mainstream media that’s built up over years (referred to by one reporter as “guilty until proven innocent” syndrome) often dissolves when a reporter simply takes the time to meet with a story subject.

Credit: urbanrez.ca

Many people – not just Aboriginal people – prefer face-to-face interviews because it’s easier to gauge a person’s sincerity, and understand their motives. Doors will start to open for you, when an Aboriginal person discovers you’re willing to show respect for their culture, and listen to what they’re saying.

But, to really listen, you’ll need to set aside (at least momentarily) two frames of storytelling hardwired into most news reporters: the hunt for conflict and negative news.